Tuesday, December 20, 2011

Tudor Rose History and Gallery of Images

Do you recall learning about the Wars of the Roses in history class?  In the mid to late 1400s there were many battles over the throne of England.  Ultimately, the throne was won by Henry Tudor who defeated King Richard III.  Henry Tudor's mother was of the House of Lancaster whose badge was the red rose.  Richard III came from the House of York whose badge was a white rose.  Hence the name, the Wars of the Roses.  Henry Tudor married Elizabeth of York and conjoined the red and white roses creating the Tudor Rose.
The Tudor Rose is to England what the shamrock is to Ireland.  You can find the rose printed on coins, coats of arms, in stained glass windows, carved into tables, and painted on porcelain plates.  You will find it in many more places as well.  
Here are some images I've gathered from the web:


Reference Book Image
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YeomanoftheGuard badge.PNG
The insignia of the Yeoman of the Guard:
Thistle, Rose, and Shamrock
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Hand Carved Tudor Rose in Oak by Wood Carver, Jose Sarabia
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SavvySeams.com created a Tudor Rose purse pattern.  Sadly, SavvySeams.com is no longer in operation and the pattern is available only through a web archive service.  Many of the photos in the tutorial are now missing, making the pattern difficult to imterpret.  I've remixed the pattern for the flower portion of the bag HERE.  

Apparently, I was not the only one smitten with SavvySeams' pattern.  
Here are some lovely Tudor Rose purses made by others that I found on the web:

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Completed Project: Tudor Rose Bag Picture #3
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Here are some of the Tudor Rose purses I've made:
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I hope you found some of this information useful.  I enjoyed doing a bit of research and learning some new facts.  I checked my facts with several articles I found in Wikipedia.  All the images, but my own purses, were found through a google image search.

I'd love to hear your thoughts about this post.  I know some of my followers are from England, so I'm eager for some firsthand knowledge about the Tudor Rose and how it came to be.

As always, happy crafting and big hugs from Montana,

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